lyrikline blog

Video messages from China

The Chinese lyrikline partner Mindy Zhang was on tour through China and shot some little video greetings with Chinese and international poets on the occasion of the website relaunch. Thanks to Mindy, the new lyrikline website can now be navigated in Chinese too! Doesn’t this look great?

This video shows Mindy together with Chinese Poet HU Xudong who she will contribute to lyrikline in the future and German poet Steffen Popp.

In the second video we see Xiao Kaiyu, who was the first Chinese poet on lyrikline together with American poet Ilya Kaminsky who will soon be available on lyrikline too and Mindy in Shanghai.

The place where I write: Yan Jun [China]

Posted in Autoren / poets, YAN Jun by lyrikline on 18. March 2013

2月20日

一月  我吃书
在沙滩上游泳

二月  世界像切开的洋葱
清洁工回家过年
北冰洋结冰了

没有时间了  我打开电脑
分析着一个词:没有

楼下的公共汽车
乌鸦打开他黑色的钱包

2013.2.20

photo by Jiantao

photo by Jiantao

February 20th

January— I eat books
swimming at the beaches

February— the world opens like a cut onion
and the cleaning guy heads home for the New Year
The Arctic freezes in ocean ice

Time is running out. I turn on the computer
to decipher a word: out

Downstairs buses run by
A Crow opens its black wallet

2013.2.20

__________________________________

Poem about his “working room” by YAN Jun
Translated from Chinese into English by Mindy Zhang
Photo by Jiantao

i moved to this flat with my wife in 2007.
we have removed some walls to make the kitchen, living room and one bedroom open as one continual space. this corner on the photo is my working space. surrounded by books and cds as everywhere in the flat.
computer. sound card and monitor speakers. telephone. hand write notes. spice smell from kitchen some times.

                                                         Yan Jun, Peking/China

Yan Jun on lyrikline

Advent Calendar – 8

Posted in Autoren / poets, YAN Jun by lyrikline on 8. December 2012

YAN Jun, photo: gezett.de

We go to China, where our latest voice works as a poet, musician and critic. His poetry is surreal and concrete, energetic and full of self-irony at the same time.

Advent Calendar door 8 reveals the Chinese poet

YAN Jun

(with translations into German)

Yan Jun was born in 1973 in Lanzhou, China. His readings are unconventional, combining poetry with electronic sound collages into what he calls ‘Hypnotic Noise’. As well as these performances, he is increasingly also doing spare readings that are minimalistically conceived.

Tagged with: ,

New partners in the lyrikline.org network / Neue Partner im lyrikline.org Netzwerk

Posted in about us by Heiko Strunk on 16. June 2011

The network of partners of lyrikline.org has expanded. We welcome our partners in Iceland, Lithuania, Russia and China

Das Partnernetzwerk von lyrikline.org ist größer geworden. Wir begrüßen unsere Partner in Island, Litauen, Russland und China

Iceland/Island : Bókmenntasjóður – The Icelandic Literature Fund (Reykjavik)
Lithuania/Litauen: Koperator – Tarptautinių kultūros programų centras – The International Cultural Programme Centre (Vilnius)
Russia/Russland
: Новая литературная карта России – New Literary Map of Russia (Moskau)
China: DJS Art Foundation [private foundation to support poetry and arts] (Los Angeles)

Welcome!

Michèle Métail zum Welttag der Poesie

Posted in Autoren / poets, Michèle Métail by Heiko Strunk on 19. March 2010

Das chinesische Zeichen shi 詩 (Lyrik) besteht aus zwei Hauptteilen, links yan 言 (das Wort), in dem kou 口 (der Mund) erkennbar ist. Und rechts das Wort si 寺 (der Tempel).
“Worte im Tempel”, denn die ersten Gedichte waren in China Tempelgesänge. Die ältesten, die wir noch heute lesen können, stammen aus dem XI° Jahrhundert vor unserer Zeitrechnung.
Drei Tausend Jahre später, was dürfen wir noch in diesem Wort suchen, wenn man keine Spur von Religiosität mehr empfindet? Einfach die Lust neue Beziehungen zu bilden! Wie in dem Wort Tempel, das selbst auch aus zwei Teilen besteht : 土 tu (die Erde) und 寸 cun (das Längenmaß Zoll). Ein Stückchen Erde, so groß ist unsere Welt durch die Globalisierung geworden, und Worte in der Welt wäre vielleicht die schönste Metapher für Lyrik an diesem besonderen Tag.
Michèle Métail, Frankreich

– – –

The Chinese sign shi 詩 (poetry) consists of two main parts: on the left side there is yan 言 (the word), in which also the sign for kou 口 (the mouth) is visible. And on the right side there is the sign si 寺 for temple.
“Words for the temple”, because the first poems in China were chants, poems cited in the temple. The oldest ones, which are still available to us today, originate from the XI. Century BC.
Today, three thousand years later, we have to ask what we expect to find in this word, when there is no trace of religiousness left in us. – Simply, the joy of generating new relations! As in the word temple, which itself consists of two parts: 土 tu (the earth) and寸 cun (an inch). A piece of the earth that has gotten so big through globalization, and the “words in the world” might be the most beautiful metaphor for poetry on this special day.
Michèle Métail, France

[Translated by Rebecca Bartusch]

Michèle Métail on lyrikline.org

The Chinese sign shi (poetry) consists of two main parts: on the left side there is yan (the word), in which also the sign for kou (the mouth) is visible. And on the right side there is the sign si for temple.

“Words for the temple”, because the first poems in China were chants, poems cited in the temple. The oldest ones, which are still available to us today, originate from the XI. Century BC.

Today, three thousand years later, we have to ask what we expect to find in this word, when there is no trace of religiousness left in us. – Simply, the joy of generating new relations! As in the word temple, which itself consists of two parts: tu (the earth) and cun (an inch). A piece of the earth that has gotten so big through globalization, and the “words in the world” might be the most beautiful metaphor for poetry on this special day.

Michèle Métail, France