lyrikline blog

World Poetry Day and an Open Call from Belgium

To celebrate World Poetry Day on March 21, Lyrikline publishes six fine new poets from around the world between March 19-21 (find all their names below).

Laurence Vielle, photo © Isaora Sanna

Laurence Vielle

One of them is Wallonian poet Laurence Vielle, the first poet contributed by our new Wallonian network partner L’Arbre de Diane.

Laurence was the Belgian National Poet until Els Moors took over in January of 2018. Now Els Moors has started an open call in connection with World Poetry Day:

Adopt your city with a poem

On the 21st of March, World Poetry Day, the National Poet of Belgium, Els Moors, invites all people worldwide to gather their most beautiful odes and elegies on their cities (/ countries / states / …) and make them public. In times of gentrification, mass tourism and worldwide migration we are craving for lonely flâneurs and notorious wanderers who want to lay bare the mysterious heart of their cities. Are you still in love with the city you were born in? Were you pushed on by love, or obliged to leave your hearth and home? Adopt your city by writing an urban elegy and take part in the writing of the most exotic Lonely Planet at this time: The adopted cities.

Would you like to contribute to this special worldwide anthology, and motivate others to join?
Then join this action in a few steps:
1. Publish your own poem on our page starting the 21st of March 2018: www.adoptedcities.be
2. Post your poem on all your possible (social) media and encourage fellow citizens to adopt a city with a poem and to join the action. Everybody can share their city-poem on our website. On Facebook, please use #adoptedcities so we can follow and share your posts.
3. Enjoy an easily accessible and interactive online anthology, a playful way to motivate people to read and write poetry! 

Els Moors, private photo

Els Moors

Read the poems of Els Moors, “Dichter des Vaderlands” of Belgium here. Read the city poem of her predecessor and ambassador Laurence Vielle here.
We would – very much – like people from all over the world to take just a minute to think about poetry (and all its modern interpretations) and to write even a short piece of poetry. Let’s make a tribute to poetry and to our world together!

We hope that many people out there follow Els Moors’ call to post poems. We’d also like to invite you to discover the other new voices that we published on the occasion of this year’s World Poetry Day, next to Laurence Vielle:
M. NourbeSe Philip (Tobago/Canada)
Sukrita Paul Kumar
(India)
Benjamín Chávez (Bolivia)
Ketty Nivyabandi (Burundi/Canada) and
Yoko Tawada (Japan/Germany).

Happy World Poetry Day!

 

Poetry from India

With the start of 2018 we’ll be able to present more poetry from India on Lyrikline thanks to a newly established partnership in India. The Enchanting Verses Literary Review and poet and editor Sonnet Mondal as its country-editor for India take care of the selection and recording of new Indian poets. Their first contribution to Lyrikline is poet Anju Makhija and we’re glad that more new voices are already being prepared.

Many thanks to Sonnet Mondal not only for his efforts in presenting Indian poetry but also for an insight into poetry in India he compiled, giving us an idea about the developments from the beginning to today, the diversity of languages and the various traditions of this rich poetry universe of India.

 

Poetry from India (by Sonnet Mondal)

The literary history and tradition of India spins around poetry. From the Vedic times to the 21st century, Indian poetry has come a long way through epics, cultural intersections, conquests, devotion, local dialects, and festivals. Vedvyasa’s Mahabharata, considered as the longest epic poem in the world is so huge that there’s a saying — ‘What’s missing in the Mahabharata doesn’t exist in India’. With 110,000 couplets in eighteen sections — this epic is about seven times the combined length of Homer’s the Iliad and the Odyssey. Other India epics that substantially used poetry as the medium of expression were — Valmiki’s Ramayana, Māgha’s Shishupala Vadha, Māgha’s Kiratarjuniya, Aśvaghoṣa’s Buddhacarita and Jayadeva’s Gita Govinda. Even in these times — poetry flourished in other languages — in other parts of the country. The Sangam literature era — from 300 BC to 300 AD contains about 2381 poems in Tamil composed by 473 poets from diverse backgrounds. The Bhakti movement during the 15th and 17th century AD saw an emergence of devotional poetry, the influence of which still remains contemporary. Influenced by Vedic beliefs — the works of poets like Andal, Kabir, Tulsidas, Ramananda, Tukaram, Mirabai, and Narsinh Mehta still remain a muse of the post-post modern period.

Though most of the early Indian poetry appeared in Sanskrit — there was a shift in course of language towards the medieval period. Amir Khusrau penned mainly in Persian, but composed almost half a million verses in Persian, Turkish, Arabic, Braj Bhasha, Hindavi as well as the Khadi Boli. Later Hindus started writing in Persian and this led to the development of Indo-Persian literature. The Abd-Allāh cites over 130 names of Hindu-Persian poets who lived in the late 18th and 19th century. The first evidence of a Hindu writing Persian poetry is attributed to a Brahmin named Pandit Dungar Mal. In late 17th century — Sikhs also started contributing to the Persian poetry of India, and Guru Gobind Singh himself wrote an extensive Persian poem — Zˈafarnāma.

From Jayadeva in 12th century and Amir Khusrau in the 15th century, to Michael Madhusudan Dutt and Tagore in the 19th Century, poetry in Indian vernaculars reigned supreme. The father of Bengali Sonnet, Michael Madhusudan Dutt brought a revolution by penning the famous tragic epic — Meghnad Bodh Kavya and also by introducing blank verse in Bengali poetry.

The local and regional languages first encountered English in the beginning of the 18th century — with the break-up of the Mughal empire to British India. The first Nationalist Poet of Modern India- Henry Louis Vivian Derozio — considered the father of Indian English Poetry wrote in English and was much influenced by the English Romantic poets. Tagore translated his own work into English — in his book Gitanjali. Later, Nissim Ezekiel and A.K. Ramanujan wrote much under the influence of post-war American Poets and some British poets like Wilfred Owen. Ramanujan travelled to America in 1959 and stayed in Chicago until his death in 1993. He wrote profusely during these years. Indian English poetry- from Derozio and Toru Dutt through Nissim Ezekiel, A.K. Ramanujan and Jayanta Mahapatra to present day poets is recognized worldwide. It has come up as a form that has its own tradition, lyrical quality, approach, delivery and style. Inspite of the surge of Indian English literature, regional language literature through the hundreds of languages spoken in India today — has remained close to the hearts of readers. Regional languages in the country has given rise to many countries within one country bounded by boundaries without lines. Regional poetry in India, allows an insight into the diverse depictions and presentation of same things by different regions of India.

Delving into Indian poetry, is like descending an age old cave in search of minerals, wall arts and history. Selecting poets for Lyrikline cannot be all inclusive but there would be a constant quest to include the best contemporaries from various Indian languages.

Sonnet Mondal, photo: John Minihan

Sonnet Mondal, photo: John Minihan

ref:​ (Abd-Allāh, p. 216; McLeod, p. 80; Shackle and Mandair, pp. 137-44).

 

Sonnet Mondal is the author of Ink and Line and five other books of poetry. Winner of the 2016 Gayatri Gamarsh Memorial Award for literary excellence, Mondal was one of the authors of the ‘Silk Routes’ project of the IWP, University of Iowa, from 2014 to 2016. He is the editor-in-chief of the Enchanting Verses Literary Review, and lives in Kolkata.

Corresponding Texts – Translation as a Call and Response

Posted in Autoren / poets, Marion Poschmann, Sharmila Cohen, translator / Übersetzer by lyrikline on 14. November 2017

When translator Sharmila Cohen sent lyrikline her translations of Marion Poschmann’s cycle of poems “künstliche Landschaften“, what we received was much more than a mere translation.

künstliche Lanschaften 1 / articifical landscapes 1 @Sharmila Cohen

Marion Poschmann’s künstliche Landschaften 1 / articifical landscapes 1 ©Sharmila Cohen

We found these experimental visualised texts so intestesting that we asked Sharmila if we could publish them here on our blog and she agreed.

künstliche Landschaften 2 / artificial landscapes

Marion Poschmann’s künstliche Landschaften 2 / articifical landscapes 2 ©Sharmila Cohen

Sharmila Cohen on this project:

This series is part of a project that investigates poetry translation as a correspondence between author and translator. For this translation, I took Marion Poschmann’s original poems and translated them in two ways: first by attempting to faithfully retain as much of the original content from the German version as possible; and then by writing new poems that directly responded to each of her texts. In this way, non-German-speaking readers gain insight into the German text through these two distinct vantage points. There is also a third sort of “translation” going on here: a visual representation of the translation act itself. Using various design elements, I attempted to show the movement and relationship between all three versions of each text, depicting a sense of call and response, as well as enforcing the notion of creative translation as an evolving form of interpretation.

künstliche Landschaften 3 / articifical landscapes 3

Marion Poschmann’s künstliche Landschaften 3 / articifical landscapes 3 ©Sharmila Cohen

About the translator:

Sharmila Cohen lives in Berlin, where she initially moved on a Fulbright Scholarship to investigate poetry in translation and now works as a freelance writer, translator, and editor. She is a co-founding editor of the translation press Telephone Books. Her work can be found in Harper’s Magazine, Circumference, and Epiphany, among other places.

künstliche Landschaften 4 / articifical landscapes 4

Marion Poschmann’s künstliche Landschaften 4 / articifical landscapes 4 ©Sharmila Cohen

German poet Marion Poschmann was asked to be this year’s lyrikline curator, tasked with selecting four German speaking poets to be recorded for the website in 2017. She will introduce her selections at an event at Haus für Poesie in Berlin on November 16, 2017.

künstliche Landschaften 5 / articifical landscapes 5

Marion Poschmann’s künstliche Landschaften 5 / articifical landscapes 5 ©Sharmila Cohen

 

Petr Borkovec zur tschechischen Lyrik der letzten zwanzig Jahre

Posted in Autoren / poets, country portrait, Länderporträt, our network partners, Petr Borkovec by lyrikline on 1. November 2017

Petr Borkovec (*1970) ist ein weit über Tschechien hinaus geschätzter Dichter. Wir kennen ihn, seit er 2004 als Gast des Berliner Künstlerprogramm des DAAD nach Berlin kam. Fast genauso so lange kann man seine Gedichte schon auf lyrikline hören; nun um 5 neue, 2017 aufgenommene Gedichte erweitert.

Borkovec_Skiba2
Foto: Dirk Skiba

Petr organisiert in Prag die Lesungen des Café Fra und war u.a. Kurator der deutsch-tschechischen Lyrik-Reihe Im Hier und Jetzt des Goethe-Institut Prag. Er hat einen exzellenten Überblick über aktuelle Poesie und 2012 einen lesenswerten Essay zur tschechischen Lyrik der letzten 20 Jahre geschrieben, den es inzwischen auch in deutscher Übersetzung gibt. Wir danken unserem tschechischen Lyrikline-Partner für den Hinweis auf diesen Essay und dem Autor und dem Goethe-Institut Prag dafür, dass wir ihn hier veröffentlichen dürfen. (Den tschechischen Originaltext findet man unterhalb der deutschen Übersetzung.)


Die Begegnung mit den Arbeiten eines jungen Dichters lässt den Lyriker Petr Borkovec über die tschechische Lyrik der letzten zwanzig Jahre nachdenken.

Heute habe ich einen Brief mit Gedichten bekommen, von einem Autor, der 1990 geboren wurde. Die Gedichte sind, glaube ich, gut, einige sind mir sehr nahe, bestimmt werde ich was davon drucken. Der Dichter wurde in dem Jahr geboren, in dem ich mein erstes Buch veröffentlicht habe. Beide sind also gleichalt. Es wäre so schön, sage ich mir, wenn ich seine Lyrik überhaupt nicht verstünde, spüren würde, wie fern sie mir in jeder Hinsicht ist, und gleichzeitig von ihr fasziniert wäre, ihr verfiele. Doch das passiert nicht. Ich lese sie, wähle aus, sortiere, ordne, einige Gedichte lege ich beiseite. Entweder ist aus mir ein literarischer Routinier geworden (was wahrscheinlich ist) oder die tschechische Lyrik hat sich in den letzten zwanzig Jahren nicht allzu sehr verändert.
Ich weiß es nicht. Normalerweise denke ich darüber nicht nach.

Vor zwanzig Jahren…

Kein Dichter hat hier in diesen zwanzig Jahren literarisch Revolution gemacht und die tschechische Dichtung in eine unerwartete und unerforschte Richtung gewendet, das ist wahr. Aber wollte das jemand? (more…)

Nigeria celebrates Niyi Osundare’s 70th birthday on World Poetry Day

Posted in Niyi Osundare, our network partners, Remi Raji by lyrikline on 21. March 2017

Niyi Osundare is Nigeria’s most acclaimed poet. He turned 70 only some day ago, on March 12th. In his home Nigeria he is honoured with an impressive event organised on World Poetry Day in Ibadan. On the occasion of his 70th birthday and World Poetry Day we are proud to present Niyi Osundare on lyrikline where you can now listen to him read seven of his poems.

Remi Raji of Diktaris, the Nigerian partner organisation of lyrikline, pays tribute to this great Nigerian poet.

 

Niyi Osundare: Gardener and Warrior of Light at 70

by Remi Raji

The gardener of redolent words, the warrior of light, is three scores and ten years on Mother Earth. Niyi Osundare is undoubtedly one of the most enduring voices of Nigerian second generation poetry.

Niyi Osundare, photo: gezett

Fire in the bushels of barbarians, scourge of tyrants and traitors, the predictable voice against the conclaves of corruption, he of million metaphors, neither tired nor tiring of speaking truth to crookedness in high and low places.

Born on March 12, 1947 in Ikere-Ekiti, Nigeria, Niyi Osundare has achieved solid fame through hard work, diligence, and a dogged commitment to creativity and intellectual distinction. Grand and multiple award winner for his numerous books of poetry, he is always in great and real elements in the classroom, as trainer and high priest of knowledge. I am certainly not the only witness to Osundare’s unique teaching style…being one in a long list of his Creative Writing students at the University of Ibadan, Nigeria.

Ten years ago, on the occasion of his sixtieth birthday, I penned a tribute about Osundare’s philosophy of art:

Chinua Achebe teaches us a masterful and disarming narrative style filled with both lessons and puzzles; Soyinka bequeaths to us a large canvass of artistic genius and political daring; and Okigbo, the combination of the puzzle and the daring that the real author is all about, provides us with the limitless possibilities of the Muse, the true excitement of imagination. In his poetry and essays, Osundare, the scion of Osun captures the vagaries of the African dilemma, with the deep emotive insight of a revolutionary artist. Always, he queries the “jangling discord” of the Nigerian nation in a harmonious language made for intimacy and intelligibility; he draws consistently on the heritage of Yoruba verbal elegance which he transforms onto the graphic and permanent intelligence of the written word; for him the page is only a tangible site for the performance of the poetic text, and the voice, with the atmosphere of delivery, is the thing. To read a poem sitting, or standing like Sigidi, he insists, is to commit an abominable act, a disservice to the pageant of the enchanted word!
Indeed, Niyi Osundare is the poet of the alter-native tradition par excellence.

Global Nigerian. African Patriot. Engaging Poet. Three odd things to be at the same time, at all time, Niyi Osundare continues a healthy dialogue with his country and continent, without apologies, without compromise and without anxieties. Master of romantic and satirical verses, his most recent poem to the Nigerian/African public sphere is indeed both topical as it is provocative: “My Lord, Tell Me Where to Keep Your Bribe”.

We celebrate Olosunta’s child, Katrina’s survivor, we celebrate decades of unrelenting writing and activism. Many hearty cheers to the author of Songs of the Marketplace, Village Voices, A Nib in the Pond, The Eye of the Earth, Moonsongs, Songs of the Season, Waiting Laughters, The Word is an Egg, Tender Moments, Random Blues…etc.
May many more celebrations come and go like the rains in the predictable hour.

World Poetry Day Event
A special interactive event on World Poetry Day (Tuesday, March 21, 2017) is dedicated to Niyi Osundare’s ideas and poetry under the title “Poetry, Politics and Society.”

Participants include Nelson Fashina (author of Gods at the Harvest, 1998), Ademola Dasylva (ANA Poetry Prize winner, 2006), Tade Ipadeola (NLNG Poetry Prize winner, 2013), Jumoke Verissimo (Creative Coordinator of Ibadan Poetry Foundation, and author of I am Memory, 2008 and The Birth of Illusion, 2015) and Matthew Umukoro (author of Dross of Gold, 2002).
Also scheduled to perform at the event is a list of emerging and engaging Nigerian poets like Funmi Aluko, Ibukun Adeeko (Winner of the Babishai Poetry Prize, 2015), Charles Akinsete, Ndubuisi Martins Aniemeka, Bartholomew Akpah, Sola Ojikutu, Oladele Noah, Oredola Ibrahim, Theo Edokpayi, Danladi Sunday, O’Busayor, Saddiq Dzukogi (ANA Teen Author Prize winner & Brunel International African Poetry Prize, 2017 Shortlist) and Rasaq Malik (Brunel International African Poetry Prize, 2017 Shortlist).

The venue of the programme is the Faculty of Arts Quadrangle, University of Ibadan, Ibadan.
Time: 18.00 – 20.00.

This is an Open Event.

Event Coordination:
DIKTARIS-NIGERIA, in partnership with LYRIKLINE, BERLIN-GERMANY
Supported by:
IBADAN POETRY FOUNDATION (IBPF)
RSVP
+2348088636663
+2347032483428

 

Remi Raji is a Nigerian poet, scholar, literary organiser, and cultural activsit. He is a member of the lyrikline partner network with Diktaris and his poems can be read and listened to on lyrikline.

 

Poetry from Burundi

Posted in Adams Sinarinzi, Autoren / poets, country portrait, Länderporträt, our network partners by Heiko Strunk on 20. April 2016

By Adams Sinarinzi of Ubuntu Advocates Initiative, the Lyrikline partner organisation in Burundi

Presenting poetry from Burundi is not an easy task. T.S. Eliot seemed to think true poetry is hardly translated, and one needs to truly sense where those words are from. Until the emergence of the modern, there was no need of presentingpoetry, for poetry was part of life.

….do you feel her drive?
Look at his eyes,
Do you read his verse? 
[1]

But the unity of life, some will say, was lost with the last myth and cosmic societies, that Burundi belonged to until a century ago. Dissolved by the increasing requirements of the modern world, several separate and independent spheres were born. One of them, the arts and culture, has grown (often unwillingly) to acquire the function of precisely representing the lost unity.

Beyond their powers to express the various contradictions and sensitivities, the world literature offers us symbolic levers for an understanding and appropriation of our lives. The young contemporary Burundian literature is best understood in this context, which is of an attempt to understand its environment and express its sensibility to the world.

In his academic book La Littérature de langue française au Burundi, [2] Professor J. Ngorwanubusa of the University of Burundi regrets however the few avenues for the literature of Burundi. There is barely any publishing house; a few reviews had been existing in the 1960s and 1970s but never survived except a few Christian reviews run by a few members of the Burundi Catholic Church.

samandari_10_SW.jpg

But the interested literary person won’t miss the corners behind the central market where the old (often stolen!) books are sold, the oldest book storeLibrairie St Paul, or the French cultural center (whose interesting café hosts the unfortunately more and more penniless intellectuals in the city!) and of course the newly opened Lire Africa in Gallerie Alexander, specializing in fiction from Africa. A blog by the poet Thierry Manirambona (“la plume burundaise”) lists an impressive archeology of Burundian books old and new, and a few poets do publish their poetry  directly on the internet as the acclaimed Ketty Nivyabandi.

Poetry in print might be hard to find in the country, but if you are insisting you will discover the underground intellectual and literary scene of the marvelous Café literaire Samandari that meets every Thursday evening at the Burundi Palace right in the middle of the city center. But one should say they met there, for since a year now these meetings are no longer held. (more…)

Map of a Thousand Lives – A Brief Introduction to Poetry in Malaysia

By Pauline Fan of Kala, the Lyrikline partner organisation in Malaysia

An attempt to chart the origins and evolution of modern poetry in Malaysia unearths complex historical processes and cultural interactions that have shaped contemporary Malaysian society. To speak of the writing of poetry in Malaysia, one must grapple with – or at least try to imagine – the essentially pluralist and polyglot nature of its people as well as the changing socio-cultural landscape, where “the map of a thousand lives will be seen* ”.

Malaysia is a country where at least four main languages predominate – Malay, English, Chinese and Tamil, further punctuated by a multitude of dialects and colloquialisms according to clan or region. The multicultural and multilingual population of the Malay Peninsula has been evident since at least the 15th century, when the Sultanate of Malacca rose to become one of the most thriving entrepôts in Asia, drawing merchants, scholars, and envoys from neighbouring kingdoms and faraway empires alike. Successive waves of immigrants from all over the Malay Archipelago, China, and India – some of whom settled, intermarried, and formed new distinct communities and cultures such as the peranakan or Straits-born communities – added yet more layers to the inextricable diversity of Malaysian society.

The conquest of Malacca by Portuguese (1511) and Dutch (1641) imperial powers preceded British colonial control, and later the Japanese occupation, of the Malay Peninsula and the northern provinces of Borneo.  Each of these imperialist presences left an indelible mark on the cultural landscape of Malaysia, including on the Malay language in the case of Portuguese, Dutch and English, adding to the vast compendium of loanwords in Malay from Arabic, Persian, Sanskrit, Tamil, and Chinese. The Malay language served as a lingua franca for the Malay Archipelago for centuries, and forms the basis of the standardised national languages of both Malaysia (Bahasa Malaysia) and Indonesia (Bahasa Indonesia), mutually intelligible with some differences in vocabulary and spelling.

Oral traditions and pan-Malay poets

The origins of Malay-language poetry can be traced to the vast and various oral traditions that have been cradled in the Malay Archipelago as well as classical Malay texts known as Hikayat that date back as far as the 14th century. Traditional Malay poetic forms include the syair, the pantun, the gurindamand seloka, all of which are found in both oral and written literature. While traditional or classical, many of these poetic forms are intrinsically innovative, urging improvisation and spontaneous composition. The pantun, for instance, was sometimes performed as balas pantun, a call-and-response ‘duel’ or ‘flirtation’ between two poets, especially during performances of the Dondang Sayang (love ballads) of Malacca. (more…)

10 New Voices from Europe

Posted in Anja Golob by Heiko Strunk on 14. April 2016

Ten of the most interesting writers working in Europe today have been selected for special promotion by an international jury drawn from prestigious literary venues and festivals.

The list includes poets and novelists as well as translators and non-fiction writers from ten European countries – Catalonia, Croatia, Hungary, Portugal, Macedonia, Malta, Norway, Scotland, Slovenia and Turkey, and was announced at the 2016 London Book Fair on Thursday 14 April 2016, as part of the Literary Europe Live project led by lyrikline network  partner Literature Across Frontiers.

The New Voices 2016 are:
Juana Adcock (GB)
Bruno Vieira Amaral (PT)
Clare Azzopardi (MT)
Rumena Buzarovska (MK)
Erika Fatland (NO)
Albert Forns (ES)
Anja Golob (SI)
Arpad Kollar (HU)
Ciwanmerd Kulek (TR)
Zoran Pilić (HR)

Over the next twelve months, the work of these ten literary creators will be promoted in a series of live and digital events across the European Union and beyond. An anthology of their writings will also be published.
The aim of the New Voices from Europe selection is to highlight the richness and diversity of European writing in all its genres and languages, including minority languages.

Our New Voices will be given an opportunity they might not otherwise have with similar international or European awards,” said the Director of Literature Across Frontiers, Alexandra Büchler. “Some of them write in a language which a national jury might not read or their own state does not recognise, despite the fact that it is spoken by millions. Alternatively, they may be writing in a language so small that their readership at home is limited to hundreds and there are few literary translators who can render their work in other languages. But all this does not mean that they should not be heard – so with the New Voices selection, we are doing what Literature Across Frontiers has done for the past fifteen years now. We’re making literature travel, sometimes from the most unexpected places.

http://www.lit-across-frontiers.org/

Biographies

1. Juana Adcock is a poet and translator who has lived in Scotland since (more…)

Poetry and Performance – Overview

Posted in Uncategorized by lyrikline on 24. March 2016

poetry and p

The celebration of World Poetry Day is over – but the playlists and the postings about Poetry and Performance are still online. This is an overview of all interviews, videos and texts.

 

(1) Approaching UNESCO World Poetry Day

Essay about  performance and expectations towards a performative event

lyrikline playlist live performances

(2) Reading and Recording

Video of a recording session and a reading by Carolin Callies [German with English summary]

lyrikline playlist studio hightlights

(3) No performance without an audience

Interview with scientist and poet Anja Utler about the reception of spoken poetry

lyrikline playlist talking to the audience

(4) Presenting a poem in different ways

Interview with Gerhard Falkner about artistic cooperation [German video with English summary]

lyrikline playlist music performances

(5) Voices in action

Videos of three artists in the field of spoken word, rap and slam poetry

lyrikline playlist spoken word performer

(6) Sound out loud!

Interview with Pierre Guéry, Eirikur Örn Norddahl and Jaap Blonk about their performative experiences

lyrikline playlist sound poetry

(7) World Poetry Day

Celebration of World Poetry Day with performances of Kurt Schwitters, Jaap Blonk and Anat Pick

Poesie und Performance – Eine Übersicht

Posted in Uncategorized by lyrikline on 24. March 2016

poetry and p

Die Festivitäten zum Welttag der Poesie sind vorbei – doch die deutschen und englischen  Beiträge und Playlists zu Poesie und Performance sind weiterhin online. Eine Übersicht über die einzelnen Texte, Videos und Interviews erleichtert den Zugriff:

 

(1) Welttag der Poesie auf lyrikline

Ein einleitendes Essay erläutert eine Verwendung des Performance-Begriffs, ein kurzer Audio-Betrag gibt Einblicke in die Erwartungen an eine Performance von Seiten des Publikums.

lyrikline playlist live performances

(2) Lesungen und O-Töne

Die Dichterin Carolin Callies wird filmisch bei einer Aufnahmesituation im Tonstudio der lyrikline und bei einer Lesung in der Literaturwerkstatt Berlin begleitet. Unterschiedliche Arten des Lyrikverständnisses werden aufgegriffen.

lyrikline playlist studio highlights

 (3) Keine Performance ohne Rezipierende

In einem ausführlichen Interview gibt die Wissenschaftlerin und Dichterin Anja Utler Auskunft über ihr Forschungsgebiet “Wahrnehmung von gesprochenen Gedichten”.

lyrikline playlist talking to the audience

(4) Viele Arten ein Gedicht zum Sprechen zu bringen

Ein Video zeigt den Dichter Gerhard Falkner im Interview mit lyrikline über seine Kooperationen mit anderen Künstlern und den Performances, die dabei entstehen.

lyrikline playlist music performances

(5) Voices in action

Drei Videos mit TJ Dema, Sharrif Simmons und Maud Vanhauwaert  zeigen die kraftvolle Wirkung von Gedichten im Umfeld von Spoken Word, Rap und Slam Poetry.

lyrikline playlist spoken word performer

(6) Sound out loud!

In einem englischen Interview berichten die Soundpoeten Pierre Guéry, Eirikur Örn Norddahl und Jaap Blonk von ihren performativen Ansprüchen und Erlebnissen.

lyrikline playlist sound poetry

(7) World Poetry Day

Wir feiern den Welttag der Poesie mit drei großartigen Performances von Kurt Schwitters, Jaap Blonk und Anat Pick.